April 2022

Katrin was born in Frankfurt, Germany and grew up near Salzburg, Austria - or, as she tells people around here, “where they filmed The Sound of Music”!

She received her Master’s Degree in American and German Literature and Art Education at the Goethe University in Frankfurt. Over the years, she has taken many art classes and workshops throughout Austria and Germany. While studying in Frankfurt, she spent 4 years doing theater with the US Army/USO, both onstage as well as backstage. That's where she discovered her love for theater set work. 

 

She met her American husband Titus during that time, they moved to the States in 1997 and now live in Nashville with their 2 awesome boys, Alex and Chris. Since living here, she participated in numerous art crawls and exhibits, is teaching art classes, and loves painting sets for community theaters around town. She also just wrote and illustrated her first children's book, eager to do many more! 

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February & March 2022

Shannon Juliano is a southern girl with a born passion for art. At the age of twelve, her world was flipped upside down when she was diagnosed with Leukemia. It was a 7 ½ year battle, but it really helped to change her perspective on life. Her faith, prayer, friends, family and love for art carried her through it — triumphantly. So, naturally, she wanted to continue that passion.

 

The abstract expressionistic artwork she creates is a celebration of life. It’s a labor of love that flows from her heart, filled with gratefulness and thanksgiving. All the layers, textures, marks and colors are there for the viewer to examine and explore. They echo the “layers’ and events in our lives — all woven together in their imperfection, creating something rich and beautiful.

 

She feels she’s still here for a purpose, and that purpose is to celebrate this journey called life through the creation of her artwork! And she hopes that viewers are blessed with joy and inspiration as they pause to experience her work — lifting their souls one piece at a time.

January 2022

The Murfreesboro Art League is one of those “hidden gems” that has been around for a long time. Locals are constantly coming in and saying: “How long have you been here?” When they learn that we’ve been in this same location for over 40 years, they are shocked.

The Murfreesboro Art League was founded back in 1966 by Clarice Nelson when she moved to town. She and two of her friends decided they wanted an art club. At first, they met in the basement of a local bank, but when the city of Murfreesboro was making Cannonsburgh Village as part of the Centennial celebration in 1976, the art league purchased a part of an old warehouse in the village and converted it into an art gallery and classroom. We have been meeting in the same location since that time, although we have undergone a couple of name changes, as well as many interior changes.​

The members of the art league are as varied as the art that hangs on the walls. We invite everyone, from beginners to the more advanced. We can each learn from each other, no matter what our level of expertise. Membership is open to individuals, as well as families with children ages 10 and up. The children may participate if a family member attends the classes with them.

 

The Murfreesboro Art League is an ideal way for new artists to begin to show their work. Not only do we have the gallery in Cannonsburgh, but we also show several times a year at different locations, such as the City Hall Rotunda and the Center for the Arts. We show at the Greenway Arts Fest, and several of our artists participate in other local events like the Studio Arts Tour. We also have our own “showcase artist” as well as a spot in the foyer of the Linebaugh Library where we show the “artist of the month”.

The art gallery is open to the public for free viewing. See our blog for current open times (murfreesboroartleague.blogspot.com).

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Hearts Poster

December 2019

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Hearts of Tennessee is a community-building project that has involved local artists of all ages, races and socioeconomic categories.  The project consists of three phases. In Phase I of the project, 24 local artists painted 24 large (24") aluminum hearts fabricated by local blacksmith Joe Brown. Local artists, painter Norris Hall and sculptor Lewis Snyder, consulted with project organizers on materials that would be weather sustaining.  Project organizers contacted local businesses to sponsor the hearts. This money was used for paint and materials for the hearts, and the remaining will be used toward the final sculpture. In October 2018, at the Boro Art Crawl, on the public square in Murfreesboro, the hearts were displayed on easels for the public to view.  After the event, the hearts were displayed around the courthouse square in business windows.

 In Phase II,  they will be collected and assembled into public art with a 14' centerpiece sculpture that will reside in the Breezeway by Gateway Island. The design of this sculpture was developed by Michael Baggerly, Sharon Kolli and Ginny Togrye with the theme of Hearts of TN promoting the love and inclusiveness of our city. The hearts will be a secondary element around the centerpiece sculpture and placed in a lower base and concrete pad. A honeycomb grid fence will be around the entire sculpture installation fitting in with the Breezeway's theme of pollination. Phase III of the project will add an open gazebo with seating.  Our goal is for this to be the first of many public sculptures our citizens can enjoy and to set our city on a path as a cultural destination.  

Participating artists include Lisa Sims, Richard Spry, Susan Rodehaver, Diane Stockard, Sharon Mayeux, April Broussard, Susan Gulley, Kay Currie, Lewis and Eric Snyder, Sheryl Ann Miller Turman, Suzanne LeBeau, Phil Wagner, Delaney Fitzhugh, Carol Berning, Dawn Magliacano, Norris Hall, Mira Patel, Ashley Buchanon, Lisa Browning, Abby Reish, Sharon Kolli, Ginny Togrye, Kory Wells, Lynn Anthony, and Janice Reeves.

October & November 2019

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Casey Malone is a retired educator who began pursuing digital photography after spending 32 years in the middle school classroom.

 

Casey has been creating digital fine art for the past seven years.  He has won numerous awards and has shown his art in multiple exhibits in the Southeast. Casey’s image, “Reflecting” recently won Runner-up as Best in Show at the 2019 Focus on the Boro Photography Exhibit.

 

Through his landscape images, Casey seeks to capture the emotion of the land  or the sea and those things which make nature so soothing and comforting to us all.  He also enjoys photographing objects of Americana that have stood the test of time. He is passionate about creating images which evoke a determination to overcome and survive.

 

To Casey beauty can come in a rusty car, a well worn fishing boat, a weather-beaten flower, or a cliff shrouded in morning fog.

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August & September 2019

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Woman's Work is a collective exhibition featuring a group of women working across multiple mediums. Featuring the works of Laine Bratcher Cantrell, Heloise Shilstat, Robin Caddell, Pamela Mack, Sheryl Thurman Miller and Susan Carter.

LAINE BRATCHER CANTRELL: I began my art career in photography focusing primarily on black and white hand tinted portraits. Expanding to landscapes and interiors using bold colors of oils on photographic prints, I started to blend photography and painting. At the advent of digital technology, I turned to acrylic and oil on canvas and included digital paintings as part of my artwork. I am now exploring encaustics, the art of painting with heated bees wax. According to Wikipedia, the word encaustic originates from the Greek word enkaustikos which means to burn in. Earliest works date back one hundred to three hundred A.D. It is an old art form that I find fascinating. Using a heat gun and heated bees wax, I try to create pieces that are luminous, colorful and free.

 

HELOISE SHILSTAT: My paper mosaics are “painted” using quality magazine paper and Elmer’s glue. The first ones I made in 2005 were from seed catalogs: a turkey and a mosaic version of Picasso’s Le Coq. Some of my next pictures were farm scenes with round hay bales, for which I used photos of blond hair. I try never to use leaves for leaves, flowers for flowers, etc., but the shortage of non-plant green in fashion and architectural magazines (the best paper) is a challenge. Subjects are usually inspired by my time in the woods or on the river, and sometimes from dreams. Occasionally, I copy Childe Hassam or Gustav Klimt paintings. I have no formal training and my degree is in engineering. My formal career related to advising on environmental regulations.

 

SUSAN CARTER: I paint abstract and representational acrylic paintings on canvas, bright whimsical watercolor portraits of people and animals, and murals. People, plants, birds, animals and insects that I encounter in my daily life are often featured in my artwork. I am also a Creativity Coach. Although all of the creativity gatherings are about empowerment some are centered on calmness and relaxation others are fun-focused.

 

SHERYL THURMAN MILLER: Art came to me in my darkest hour. I was struggling to survive my life’s tragedies. The death of my beloved son and my mother’s battle with & loss to Alzheimer’s. Having found no comfort in therapy, the struggle for peace and normalcy consumed me. A Valentine’s gift of drawing pads and pencils from my now husband, and encouragement from a local artist opened a window. Letting light into dark corners. I discovered that when I put pen to paper and eventually paint to canvas I could stop thinking to be in the moment. I finally found peace. I am happiest when I am creating whether it be a complete abstract or a goat driving a pickup my heart has remembered how to feel the good stuff again.

 

ROBIN CADDELL: Robin Jackson Caddell is a mixed media artist. Working with fabric, paper and acrylic paint, this self-taught artist draws from her fashion background to create pieces full of movement, texture and color. Robin’s influences range from couture fashion, nature and music to faith, the evidence of which is seen in the detail of her fluid paintings and romantic whimsy of paper canvases. She lives in Christiana, TN. I have worked with paper and fabric for years, yet never considered myself an artist until recently. It is when I allowed myself the freedom to create without any pattern, restraint or limits did my ideas flow more fully! Each piece is created with joy and love and is meant to lift the spirit of the receiver.

 

PAMELA MACK: I came from a family that loved to draw. I attempted my first serious drawing when I was just five years old. That is when I drew a one-dollar bill on a piece of scrap paper. It was a very convincing piece of realism and George Washington never looked better. At least my three-year-old sister thought so, as I had persuaded her to buy some candy with it. The cashier, apparently not an art lover, wasn’t convinced and the endeavor failed. My counterfeiting days are behind me and for the past many years I’ve poured my passion, energy and creativity into oil painting. There is so much to love about the entire painting process: learning to see, sketching, holding the brush, mixing colors, the first kiss of paint to the canvas and of course, the exhilaration of creating something from the void, something that wasn’t there before.

June & July 2019

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The Pfeilstorch Incident and Other Consp
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May 2019

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Cody Hale is a contemporary artist currently based in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. He earned a B.F.A. in illustration from the Savannah College of Art and Design in 2005 and has been creating and showing work for over 13 years. While Cody creates work in a variety of mediums and techniques, he primarily works in ink, and his signature technique consists of splattering ink in multiple controlled layers on illustration board. Cody uses toothbrushes instead of traditional paint brushes as tools to create his ink splatter pieces. Visually, his work largely focusses on texture and sharp contrasting values, and the themes in his work are derived from his interpretations of popular cultural icons and his interest in the mysterious and the unknown. 

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March & April 2019

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February 2019

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A hidden beauty of the world is revealed through the Chinese brush paintings of Xie Weiqiang. Although a contemporary fine artist from China, Xie is well-known for his expertise in the classic Chinese style of painting. These exquisite paintings show the natural balance of bright feathered birds and colorful flowers. 

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January 2019

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