Audition Information

Director – Vickie Bailey

 

Performance Dates are February 18-27 (Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays)

 

Auditions

To sign up for an audition slot, email Mark Williams at mark@boroarts.org.

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Monday, December 6th: 7:00 PM

Callbacks (if needed) are Tuesday, December 7th: 7:00 PM

 

*Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script, which can be found below.  No need to prepare anything.

Audition Sides

Daisy and Boolie                                                                                     Daisy and Hoke                                                                                    Hoke and Boolie

Rehearsals will be Tuesdays and Thursdays 7:00 PM-9:00 PM and Saturdays 9:30 AM-Noon

SYNOPSIS

Set in mid-century Atlanta, Driving Miss Daisy tells the story of an elderly Jewish matron, Daisy Werthan, and her chauffeur, Hoke Coleburn. At first, Daisy is none too happy about being forced to rely on a black man to get from one place to the next. Gradually, however, Hoke wins her over, and during the 25-year span of the play, the two develop a deep-rooted affection. This Pulitzer-Prize winning masterpiece is a delicate depiction of racial tensions, the passage of time, and the experience of aging. Playwright Alfred Uhry creates two outsiders who come to a mutual respect grounded in each of their independence, strength, and stubborn integrity.

 

CHARACTERS

Daisy Werthan: a Jewish widow, native to Atlanta, Georgia. She is 72 years old in 1948 at the beginning of the play, and 97 years old in 1973 at the end of the play. Born 11 years after the end of Civil War, she witnessed some of the most significant social changes in American history.

Hoke Colburn: an African-American man, native to Georgia. He is 60 years old in 1948 at the beginning of the play, and 85 years old in 1973 at the end. Before meeting Daisy, he had neither traveled nor learned to read. He has a daughter and granddaughter.

Boolie Werthan: Daisy’s son, also born and raised in Atlanta. He is 40 years old in the first scene of the play in 1948, and 65 years old at the show’s end in 1973. He grew up through World War I, and was a young man during the Great Depression.