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Audition Information

Director – Vickie Bailey

 

Performance Dates are May 15-24 (Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays)

 

Auditions

Sunday, March 29 and Monday March 30 at 6:30pm

Callbacks (if needed) are Tuesday, March 31

 

*Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script.  No need to prepare anything.

SYNOPSIS

Set in mid-century Atlanta, Driving Miss Daisy tells the story of an elderly Jewish matron, Daisy Werthan, and her chauffeur, Hoke Coleburn. At first, Daisy is none too happy about being forced to rely on a black man to get from one place to the next. Gradually, however, Hoke wins her over, and during the 25-year span of the play, the two develop a deep-rooted affection. This Pulitzer-Prize winning masterpiece is a delicate depiction of racial tensions, the passage of time, and the experience of aging. Playwright Alfred Uhry creates two outsiders who come to a mutual respect grounded in each of their independence, strength, and stubborn integrity.

 

CHARACTERS

Daisy Werthan: a Jewish widow, native to Atlanta, Georgia. She is 72 years old in 1948 at the beginning of the play, and 97 years old in 1973 at the end of the play. Born 11 years after the end of Civil War, she witnessed some of the most significant social changes in American history. She was in Atlanta when Leo Frank was lynched in 1913 – one of the most horrific displays of anti-Semitism in Atlanta’s history. She lived through the woman suffrage movement and the passage of the 19th Amendment (which guaranteed women’s right to vote), World Wars I and II, the Temple bombing of 1958, Martin Luther King Jr.’s ascension to fame and the Civil Rights Movement, the Cold War and the beginning of the Watergate Scandal. Her father-in-law was a self-made man who founded his own business, and she and her husband enjoyed financial success. Yet through it all, she remains fiercely rooted in her frugal upbringing, her early career as a teacher, her Southern propriety and her Judaism.

Hoke Colburn: an African-American man, native to Georgia. He is 60 years old in 1948 at the beginning of the play, and 85 years old in 1973 at the end. Before meeting Daisy, he had neither traveled nor learned to read. He has a daughter and granddaughter. Although he is 12 years younger than Daisy, he has also witnessed the same pivotal events in American history. He was a young man in 1913 when Leo Frank was lynched, but as a child he had already witnessed the lynching of his friend’s father (which was a common occurrence in the state of Georgia in the late 1800s). He grew up in the thick of the Jim Crow era, experiencing for almost his whole life segregation, discrimination, injustice and racism.

Boolie Werthan: Daisy’s son, also born and raised in Atlanta. He is 40 years old in the first scene of the play in 1948, and 65 years old at the show’s end in 1973. He grew up through World War I, and was a young man during the Great Depression. He observed his parents’ dedication to their work and took over the family business, increasing its success. He is dutiful to his mother, despite her prickly personality. Though he clearly cares for Daisy, it’s not in the way that she would find most fitting.